Southern Hospitality

It all started last week with a simple post from Facebook.

Advertisements

It all started last week with a simple post from Facebook.  In the most unlikely way, a post came over offering us a place to park for a few days.  It caught us both by surprise, we didn’t know what to think or say, “Was this for real?”  Being skeptical, we decided to think on it for a day or two.

The weather was getting hotter and we really needed to find shade.  Maybe it was time to learn a little trust and accept the offer.  We didn’t have to travel far when we were greeted by  (we will call her Gail) a small, cheery-eyed woman with a warm smile and cherry cheeks. She directed us to her backyard to park ‘Dotty’, and there it was… shade, wonderful large oak trees with the charming hanging Spanish Moss.  The perfect place to keep us cool on those hot days.

We spent the first few days getting acquainted.  A lot of question was asked and answered, one being how were we going to finance ourselves? Our plan was to take on odd jobs, (according to our skill sets) and possibly work camping.  “What are those skillsets, you might ask?”  We have a few at our age, my husband, Bill, is a carpenter by trade and an all-around handyman.  Myself, I have a nack for cleaning, organizing and yard work.  Those are my specialities.  Gail was carefully listening to our story and quickly asked if we would like to extend our stay and help her with home repairs and clean up duty.  This was shock number two, we weren’t expecting that question.  She showed us around the house pointing out various needed repairs, back door casing, hanging new drywall, lawn work, etc.  We decided quickly we would like to help her out knowing she wasn’t able to do the work herself.  Labor fee was briefly discussed, however we hadn’t thought about a price, we decided to ask for donations for work completed.  We felt that was fair.  We now were well on our way to our first job with a reference…priceless.

As the days progressed and the work was getting finished a funny thing happened.  We were building a new friendship.  In the evenings we would all relaxed on her wonderful screened in back porch having drinks, meeting neighbors and just having a good ol’time talking about camping and life.  Gail went out of her way to be a gracious host.  She even cooked dinners for us and of course we joined her, she a great cook!  Our few days turned into a week.  We knew we would have to leave soon, we had another committment coming up.

This week was a complete success.  I had heard stories of the kindness of strangers, but have never experienced it.  This boondocking adventure has made us realize there are good people out there.  Gail has shown us there is kind and thoughtful people in this world, people who do care.  She is one of those people we will never forget and hope to see again in the future.  We are forever grateful to have met her and can call her our friend.

Our 2007 Road Trip, Part 2: Signs of Georgia

This is such a great post on driving through Georgia and what you will see coming down I-75. Brings back a lot of memories.

Midlife Crisis Crossover!

Giant Peanut! Behold the World’s Largest Peanut, according to the good people of Ashburn, Georgia. Also possibly the World’s Most Hypoallergenic Peanut.

Previously on Midlife Crisis Crossover:

Every year since 1999 Anne and I have taken a road trip to a different part of the United States and seen attractions, marvels, history, and institutions we didn’t have back home in Indianapolis. From 1999 to 2003 we did so as best friends; from 2004 to the present, as husband and wife. For 2007 we changed up our strategy a bit and designed an itinerary for what would prove our most kid-friendly outing ever. Granted, my son was now twelve years old and less kid-like than he used to be, but the idea was sound in principle.

Thus in this year of our Lord did we declare: the Goldens are going to Florida!

When most people think “road trip” in the fanciful sense…

View original post 2,239 more words

Maiden Voyage to the Deep South

Our first maiden voyage to the deep south in out 1975 Cruise Air motor home. We found the weather very unforgiving…

Dotty’s maiden voyage into the deep south started two Fridays ago.  We found the weather very unforgiving, at  45 to 50 mph, the winds were atrocious.  A major storm front was developing to the west.  The camper felt like a sailboat being tossed on the high seas.  After only about four hours of driving, we were exhausted.  The drive left us racked and on edge.  Making it only to Findlay, Ohio (Flag City) we parked Dotty and batten down the hatches, boondocking at the first Wal-Mart we could find.

Saturday morning came early, the winds died down to 20 mph making it a little better for driving. We sailed our way to Richmond, Ky taking it slowwww.  Dotty was running great but the steering was a little squirrely.  Noticing a rain front was coming in, Bill tested the windshield wipers.  Oops, they don’t work!  Great… not going any farther, we’ll just be boondocking at Meijers tonight.

Bill woke early Sunday morning as he always does.  Something was telling him to look at the weather radar.    We had two hours to get motivated and beat the nasty storm that was quickly building to the West.  No windshield wipers, I need to wake up fast, Ugh. With fifteen minutes to spare we headed South out running the storm front covered in red.

We didn’t talk much as we approached Southern Ky and Jellico Mountain.  The tension was building and we were both very nervous.  Would Dotty make it up the mountainside? We were gonna find out.  Well, she did.  A big 50 mph all the way up the hill.  Not fast but she made it.  It was a big sigh of relief when we got to the top.  We took a small break at the Tn. Welcome Center, which was very crowded.  Dotty was starting to draw attention from travelers.  People are eager to ask all sorts of questions about her.  She is one of a kind.

Down the mountain, she came with her sails a flying.  She had Bill a little panicked, I tried not to pay attention.  I was thinking to myself, “He’s one hell of a driver”.  I don’t know why we were so nervous, he’s driven in some of the most God awful weather conditions while expediting.   We swallowed hard and drove down the mountain.

Off to another cheap night of camping at the Flying J, south side of Knoxville, Tn.  The temperature was high, in the low 90’s.  It was not comfortable. All the windows open, we were sweat’n puddles.  Bill takes a look at our cat, Mel, and decides it’s too hot for her.  He plugs the fan into the inverter and places it on the floor facing the cat.  Well hell…It’s gonna be a great night.

It was a hot, sticky, crappy night.  Along with the heat, we had to listen to young’ns racing their hot rods up and down the street.  We won’t be staying at that Flying J again, travelers beware!

With less than a fulfilling night sleep,  we woke on Monday morning ready to get to Warner Robins, Ga.  and see the family.  Traveling was uneventful until we caught up to a major traffic jam in a Resaca, Ga.  Miles, upon miles of traffic, creeping ever so slowly down the interstate.  An hour and a half later and six miles down the road, we made it to the closest exit in Resaca.  Now how are we going to get around this mess, Google it!!  Looking at the routes, we chose Hwy 41 to get us through Atlanta.  Now, this is not a quick route, but it’s better than sitt’n in traffic.  We burned a couple of hours going through small town after small town.  Finally picking up I-75 South, we managed to pick up speed and making it to Warner Robins around 8pm that night.

What a ride, what a trip.  We’re we crazy to take a 1975 Motor Home on a 1000 mile trip South?  Part of me says “yes” but part of me says, “I would do it again.”  The stress was worth seeing the family and grandkids.  You can’t put a price on that.